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Parrtjima Curator & Artists

Parrtjima Curator

“Parrtjima means shedding both light and understanding, but it’s much more. It’s the generosity and spirit of a peoples who have and always will care for country and for the many travellers who visit this timeless land.” Parrtjima Curator Rhoda Roberts AO

A Widjabul Wiyebal woman from the Bundjalung territories, Rhoda Roberts AO is Head of First Nations Programming at Sydney Opera House, Festival Director of the Boomerang Festival, and Curator for Parrtjima – A Festival in Light. She was also Founder and Festival Director of the Dreaming Festivals (1995-2009) and Co-Founder of the Aboriginal National Theatre Trust. As an experienced, motivated and versatile arts executive, Rhoda has a diverse range of international and national experience with commercial, community and non-profit organisations. A practicing weaver, actor, independent producer and director, she continues to work as a consultant across diverse disciplines and is a sought-after speaker and performer in theatre, film, television and radio. The first Aboriginal Australian to host a prime-time current affairs program (Vox Populi on SBS), Rhoda’s Deadly Voices podcasts continue her work in broadcast, including two decades on radio show Deadly Sounds (1992-2012).

Installation: Grounded

Emrhan Tjapanangka Sultan (My Grandfather’s Country) is a distinguished Aboriginal artist whose creative journey weaves together ancestral traditions and contemporary artistic expression. Born and raised in Mparntwe (Alice Springs), he is strongly connected to his cultural values. He was taught, and given permission from his Elders, to paint in the traditional style of the Western and Central Desert art from an early age. In recent years he has been exploring different mediums, in particular digital designs and different colour pallets. In 2022, Tjapanangka helped found Solid Lines, a First Nations agency dedicated to representing First Nations illustrators. In 2023, Solid Lines took home the top Indigenous Design Award at the Good Design Awards.

Installation: Grounded

An emerging artist from the community of Wutunugurra (Epenarra), Gladys Kemarr Lewis (Bush Medicine and Flowers) is the niece and granddaughter of leading artists, Susie Peterson and Jessie Peterson. Wutunugurra is nestled in the foothills of Iytwelepenty (the Davenport Ranges), and Gladys’s playful paintings magnify the tiny wild flowers which blanket the country. Haloed with bright, line work which trace the loosely rendered shape of bush flowers in bold colours, her delicately dotted landscapes dance rhythmically across the canvas. Gladys’s work is a celebration of the simple beauty of Iytwelepenty and its wild flowers and their potent medicinal forces.

Installation: Grounded

Keahanie Baker Tunkin (Kalaya Tjurkurpa) is a young emerging artist from the Tjungu Palya Art Centre, about 100km south of Uluru. The 21-year-old has grown up on country in the Kanpi community with her grandmother, the respected senior artist Kay Baker. Keahanie has a deep love of Tjurkurpa (a system of belief for the Anangu people), always learning and re-telling the stories from her country. She loves to visit the sacred sites and important landmarks, and is eager to share what she can with others through painting, talking and inma. Developing a fresh painting style with bold colours, Keahanie’s work is deeply rooted in the land and law of her country.

Installation: Grounded

Margaret Bloomfield (Shooting Star) is related by marriage to the Young family who have been deeply involved with Keringke Arts Centre since its beginning in 1989. Her mother-in-law is founding artist Josette Young. Originally from Harts Range, Margaret moved to Ltyentye Apurte (Santa Teresa) in 2002. She began learning from local Keringke artists Mary and Evelyn Young, and soon discovered her own passion for painting. Margaret’s distinctive work is influenced by her strong relationship to family. She is also the grand-daughter of Billy Benn, a well-known Alyawarre landscape artist from Harts Range.